Blackout

Three years later and Taylor is all smiles. The 19-year-old is a sophomore at the University of Nevada, Reno and enjoys playing soccer for an intramural team. She also loves dogs and spending time in the Tahoe-Truckee area.

Three years later and Taylor is all smiles. The 19-year-old is a sophomore at the University of Nevada, Reno and enjoys playing soccer for an intramural team. She also loves dogs and spending time in the Tahoe-Truckee area.

“I jumped up for the goal and I landed on my back.”
It was a soccer goal that forever changed college sophomore, Taylor Crowhurst’s life.
“The world just turned black and there’s not much I remember after that,” Crowhurst recalls.

On October 11, 2011, Crowhurst was at the Junior Olympic soccer team tryouts, vying for a spot as goal keeper. However, the events that unfolded on that October day was a blurred memory that Crowhurst would never forget.
“I opened my eyes and told [my dad] that I couldn’t feel anything,” says Crowhurst.
Mr. Crowhurst rushed to Taylor’s side, while she lay on the cold field, motionless. Crowhurst told her father that she couldn’t feel anything, and it was not because of the shock. When the shock of her fall wore off, the goalie felt the extent of her pain, from the waist up.
“They took me to the hospital and all I could say was ‘Why can’t I move anything? Why can’t I feel anything?” and then Crowhurst was delivered life-altering news “the doctor told me I was paralyzed from the waist down.”

Now that the shock of the pain had worn off, the painful shock of the diagnosis sunk in. Crowhurst realized that she may not be able to ever walk again. At the time, the soccer player was only 16, in the prime of both her soccer and high school career. The sophomore was succeeding in her academics and kicking butt on the soccer field, but being paralyzed from the waist down was bound to alter Crowhurst’s life forever.
“This was the first time I felt helpless and that I had no control over the situation,” she said.

After facing the reality of her injury, Crowhurst knew that she had a long road to recovery.
“My recovery time was about eight months,” she said.
Those eight months were spent in and out of the hospital and physical therapy office. Day by day, Crowhurst had to learn how to walk again and strengthen her lower body. After eight long months, Crowhurst regained her ability to walk, but she was still not in as good condition as she was before the accident. Before her injury, Crowhurst already had two injured knees and with the fall she took, her soccer skills would never be the same.
“I will never be able to play soccer the way I used to but in some ways that’s a good thing. I’m more aware of what I’m doing with my body and how I move,” the sophomore explained.

After loosing and regaining her ability to walk, Crowhurst considers herself incredibly lucky to have made the recovery she did.
“I now know how precious life is and I will never take it for granted,” and her body was not the only thing that was strengthened “this has totally made me a stronger person in every way. I now know that I can get through anything that is thrown at me.”
Literally.

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