CrossFit: Muscle Building or Breaking?

The clash of weights dropping, and people grunting, is what you will hear on the CrossFit floor. Sweat drips down the foreheads and backs of everyone working out as coaches yell encouraging words. Forging elite fitness, is the mantra of CrossFit and those who participate in it. CrossFit is a workout platform that is based off of everyday, functional movements.

“We stretch, we do core. There’s power lifting, we do power lifts, olympic lifts…we bring everything into one kinda big ball and make it a total fitness,” said Cody Z. Kiser, Level 1 CrossFit coach.

Kiser joined the CrossFit nation as a way to become a stronger professional rodeo cowboy. Eventually, he fell in love with the program and workouts. This passion lead to becoming a coach and competing in CrossFit Games. Kiser is one of the many CrossFitters that stay loyal to the program and workout everyday. The daily workouts named “workout of the day,” or “WOD,” are created to strengthen every part of the body and improve agility.

“There’s long workouts, short workouts, heavy workouts, light workouts, we try to come up with a program that hits all those aspects in a week,” explained Kiser.

CrossFit Level 1 Coach Robert Forrest, also takes part in the various workouts.

“Yesterday, we had a group workout; 2000 meter row, 30 power snatches, 250 double-unders with the jump ropes, 30 cleans, 100 wall-balls, 150 push-ups and 100 pull-ups,” listed Forrest.

That group workout had a time cap of 30 minutes. For 30 minutes, an individual is constantly moving, lifting heavy weights, and testing his or her limits. Now, not all workouts are as elaborate as the WOD Forrest described. Yet, all WOD’s are typically completed in short amount of time and are designed to be intense.

CrossFitter and Coach Robert Forrest, prepares to lift a total of 155, repetitively, as a part of his workout. While participating in a CrossFit workout, there is usually a prescribed weight for both men and women. For men, the prescribed weight for lifting is usually over 100 pounds.   Since Robert is a previous competitive power lifter, and has been doing CrossFit for nearly six years, he will uses the prescribed weight. In the corner, there is a blue medicine ball that Forrest will toss, catch and squat then repeat in addition to lifting the weighted barbell. Forrest also teaches the introductory CrossFit class, Cup Corps at the University of Nevada, Reno. To sign up, visit imleagues.com.

CrossFitter and Coach Robert Forrest, prepares to lift a total of 155, repetitively, as a part of his workout. While participating in a CrossFit workout, there is usually a prescribed weight for both men and women. For men, the prescribed weight for lifting is usually over 100 pounds.
Since Robert is a previous competitive power lifter, and has been doing CrossFit for nearly six years, he will uses the prescribed weight. In the corner, there is a blue medicine ball that Forrest will toss, catch and squat then repeat in addition to lifting the weighted barbell. Forrest also teaches the introductory CrossFit class, Cup Corps at the University of Nevada, Reno. To sign up, visit imleagues.com.

“It it’s hard for them, if it’s difficult for them and challenging, that’s intensity, that’s what we’re looking for,” said Forrest.

While these workouts are proven to be effective in improving overall health, there are several people who believe that CrossFit workouts harm an individual’s physical health and increase the risk of injury. However, Kiser believes that CrossFit poses just as much of a risk for injury as any other fitness program or sport.

“With anything there’s risk involved… you can hurt yourself, but when you start pushing the limits on anything it becomes more dangerous,” said Kiser.

Kiser compares the risk to running on a track. The runner will eventually sprint, pushing their limits, but also increasing their risk of a pulled hamstring or sprained ankle. Just like in CrossFit, an individual starts with a low amount of weight and builds up, of course there is risk because his or her body is experiencing a new intensity.

According to Forrest, most CrossFit related injuries are caused by the athlete.

“These injury rates, they come from irresponsible athletes, irresponsible individuals that make poor decisions,” he explained.

Even though there is a risk for injury, physical therapist and co-owner of Active Physical Therapy, Parley Anderson, agrees that improper movement and uneducated athletes are a risk to themselves. Despite that, CrossFit does not hurt the body.

“Doing CrossFit, does it make you more prone to injury? My answer is no,” said Anderson.

All three men conclude that if a movement is too difficult during a workout, it is important to scale it back.

“When we see someone who’s doing something [unsafe] we say ‘hey, stop, slow down, let’s take some weight off the bar, let’s scale this movement, let’s find a way that you can execute it safely,” said Forrest.

Luckily, there are certified CrossFit coaches like Forrest and Kiser who help educate individuals on safety and proper movement form.

“Safety and efficiency is our number one goal,” added Forrest.

If a CrossFitter is safe and efficient, he or she can reap the benefits.

“We all wanna look good naked. It comes down to feeling good, looking good, being healthy, we’re going to live longer,” added Kiser while laughing.

Both Forrest and Kiser coach CrossFit classes at the Lombardi Recreation Center located on the UNR campus. To learn more, visit unrcrossfit.typepad.com.

For more information on Active Physical Therapy, or to contact Parley Anderson, go to activeptreno.com.

CrossFitter and Coach Robert Forrest, prepares to lift a total of 155, repetitively, as a part of his workout. While participating in a CrossFit workout, there is usually a prescribed weight for both men and women. For men, the prescribed weight for lifting is usually over 100 pounds.

Read how CrossFit saved a woman’s life: http://espn.go.com/espnw/athletes-life/article/11250303/espnw-how-crossfit-saved-miranda-oldroyd-life

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s